Once it's gone...

Volunteers Dedicated to Preserving the Wapack Trail


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The Friends maintain the following trails:

Wapack Trail
Cliff Trail
Raymond Trail
Marion Davis Trail
Berry Pasture Trail
Kidder Mt. Trail
State Line Trail
Spruce Knoll Trail

Courtesy on the Trail

Foot travel welcome

Leave NO trace

Be quiet near houses

Stay on blazed trails

Respect trailside property

Park cars so others can pass

Dogs on leash and only where allowed

Once it's gone... Once it's gone
it's gone forever.


Wapack Range from Mt. Watatic - Photo by John Callahan

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Wapack Notices!

Annual Meeting October 24! Click here for details

All new Guide to the Wapack Trail!

New this spring! Our all new, full color trail guide includes end-to-end descriptions of the Wapack Trail and eight side trails, suggested hikes with maps, and sections on geology and flora and fauna. A history section provides details on the history of the trail, the Wapack Lodge, the Friends, conservation properties, and the story of skiing along the Wapack Range. The guide includes our full color trail map. Proceeds helps support our efforts to maintain and protect the Wapack Trail.  The trail guide is currently available on our General Store webpage, and at the Toadstool Bookshops in Peterborough, Milford, and Keene. Press Release

Hiking the Wapack Trail through Windblown XC Ski Area
The Wapack Trail is closed for hiking through Windblown Cross Country Ski Area during the winter. You can purchase a ticket at the Windblown office when they are open for snow shoeing or skiing the trail. (The trail is also closed during "Mud Season" - roughly through early May.) Hiking during other seasons through Windblown is only allowed on the marked route of the Wapack Trail, and no mountain bikes please. Parking is still along the shoulder of Route 123/124 Turnpike Road, between Wapack Road and the Windblown entrance, not on Windblown property. Thank you!
 Download the Windblown Wapack Trail map with directions by clicking here.

Highlighting three great projects completed in 2014

The Friends of the Wapack trail crew has been very busy this year completing two major projects, with a third project nearing completion. We have completed the restoration of the historic Picnic Shelter on the summit of Pack Monadnock at Miller State Park. An extension to the Spruce Knoll Spur Trail is now open, leading to a wonderful outlook on Pack Monadnock. And a new base to summit trail at Temple Mt. State Reservation.

Details on these project are in our Summer e-Newsletter. Please visit our facebook page for photos.


Support the Friends of the Wapack through the TD Bank Affinity Program

Participating in the TD Bank Affinity Program is an easy and simple way to support the Friends of the Wapack. By participating, your bank account(s) will be allocated the Friends of the Wapack’s Affinity Code (AF798), linking your account to the Friends. Based on the Affinity Codes assigned to accounts, TD Bank will make a financial contribution to the Friends every year. No contribution is made from your bank accounts, you are simply showing your “affinity” to us. There are two ways to get involved and participate in the program. Current TD Bank customers can call or visit any TD Bank branch and ask to have your account(s) linked to the Friends of the Wapack through the Affinity Membership Program. Be sure to mention the Friends of the Wapack as the organization you are supporting. Our affinity code is AF798.


The Wapack Trail

In 1923, Frank Robbins and Marion Buck (Davis) of Rindge, NH, saw a dream come true: the establishment of the 21-mile Wapack Trail from Mount Watatic in Ashburnham, MA, to North Pack in Greenfield, NH, passing through sections of Ashburnham and Ashby, MA, and New Ipswich, Temple, Sharon, Peterborough and Greenfield, NH. The Wapack Trail, a day-use trail for foot travel, is one of the oldest interstate trails in the Northeast. For the most part, the trail follows a skyline route along the summits of Watatic, Pratt, New Ipswich, Barrett and Temple mountains, then ascends the Pack Monadnocks. Yellow triangles on trees and rocks blaze the Wapack. Cairns mark the trail along bare stony sections and summits. Seven miles of side trails also provide an opportunity for exploration and spectacular scenery, including the side trail to Kidder Mountain.

Open ledges and rocky peaks provide breathtaking views of Mount Monadnock, the Berkshires and the Green Mountains to the west, Boston to the southeast, and the White Mountains to the north. The spruce forests lining parts of the trail give hikers the feeling of being deep in the North Woods.

In spring and summer, wildflowers are everywhere - as well as blueberries! In fall, the countryside is ablaze with color. Wildlife includes beaver, moose, fox, rabbit, partridge, migratory birds and sometimes wild turkey. In winter, snowshoeing and ski mountaineering are outstanding.

The trail passes old homesteads, goes through state forests, Miller State Park, the Wapack National Wildlife Refuge, crosses the NH/MA state line and the Boston Post Road constructed in 1753. The site of the Wapack Lodge, built by Robbins and Davis and once a leading center for skiing during the 1920's and '30's, is seen off the trail in New Ipswich.

Help Protect our Trees!
The NH Division of Forests and Lands requests our help stop the spread of destructive exotic insects like the Asian Longhorn Beetle in our area. Please download and print out the flyer they have provided us and take it with you on the trail as a reference. The flyer includes instructions on how to report your findings. You can download the flyer by clicking here. Thank You!!


We are greatly indebted to Trailwrights, Inc. for training in trail maintenance, help with trail layout and relocations, and help with heavy trail work. THANK YOU!!


Friends of the Wapack
P.O. Box 115
West Peterborough, NH

"It would evidently be a noble walk from Watatic to Goffstown perchance, over the Peterboro mountains, along the very backbone of this part of New Hampshire, - the most novel and interesting walk that I can think of in these parts."
- Henry David Thoreau, Journal report on his final trip to Mt. Monadnock, August 9,1860

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